Courses

Isms, Judgement, Aggression and Threat in the Liberal Arts Context: People are nice here, Right?

Workshop conducted the Pomona College Residence Hall Advisor Training. The stereotype threat literature talks as if people are afraid of some ethereal “being judged as stereotypical” and so advises us to talk them out of it (the fear). In this workshop I argue that people are more likely troubled by the actual micro-aggressions (which happen to go hand in hand with “judgments”) they face on a daily basis. If that is true, Steele’s & other’s suggestions to talk them out of it seem less practical.

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Psychology of the Black Experience

This course critically reviews historical and traditional approaches to the psychological study of African Americans, exploring the complex and often tense relationship between the goals and aspirations of psychology as a discipline and those of African American people.

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Culture and Human Development: The African Diaspora

I rewrote this course for Smith college in Spring 2003 in order to orient the content around the current understanding that culture is, not a supporting influence, but central to efforts to understand human behavior. The course also emphasizes the important interplay between theory development and empirical research.

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Psychological Approaches to Human Behavior

I participated in the design & revision of this course in the summer of 2003 as part of a college wide initiative aimed at incorporating current scholarship concerning the role and relevance of culture into our coverage of various areas of the discipline. I also participated as an Instructor.

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Writing Seminar in Cultural Psychology

This seminar which I first taught with Edmund W. Gordon at Teachers College, Columbia University, closely examines the philosophical underpinnings of the sub discipline known as cultural psychology. Beginning by posing the question: What is cultural psychology? The course is designed to give students an opportunity to closely interact and examine what distinguishes Cultural Psychology from cross-cultural psychology, ethno-Psychology, even sociology and other areas that deal with similar topics in importantly different ways. The course is useful in that it uses this context to encourage students broader appreciation for the relationships between philosophy and science and for the importance of examining the assumptions implicit in any approach to scholarship. This is a graduate level course.

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Cultural Psychology: Philosophical & theoretical foundations

This seminar, which I first taught with Edmund W. Gordon at Teachers College, Columbia University, closely examines the philosophical underpinnings of the sub discipline known as cultural psychology. Beginning by posing the question: What is cultural psychology? The course is designed to give students an opportunity to closely interact and…

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